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Peter Hawkins

Peter Hawkins

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Also Known As: Peter Hawkins Died:
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Once called "the most incorruptibly independent" of British filmmakers, Maurice Hatton has managed to combine politics, humor--and even, on occasion, minor commerical success--in a remarkable career. After a series of well-received documentaries in the 60s made with then-partner John Irvin, Hatton burst upon the scene with his first feature, "Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition" (1968), combining sophisticated political analysis with a ripe and urgent sense of humor in a unique way. The story of Dom, a revoluntionary with a reactionary personality, the film dares to satirize the avant-garde politicos of the 60s at the same time that it shares their passionate commitment. It showed us then--and continues to show us not--where we went wrong. It remains a landmark, 20 years ahead of its time. Rare among contemporary British filmmakers, Hatton has been able keep the satiric flame burning on the big screen. During most of the 70s and 80s, Hatton kept himself busy with TV: "The Bouncing Boy" (1972), "Bitter Harvest" (1973), about Cesar Chavez and the California migrant workers and "Nelly's Version" (1983) stand out. Occasionally during the last 20 years Hatton has been able raise the necessary funds for a...

Once called "the most incorruptibly independent" of British filmmakers, Maurice Hatton has managed to combine politics, humor--and even, on occasion, minor commerical success--in a remarkable career. After a series of well-received documentaries in the 60s made with then-partner John Irvin, Hatton burst upon the scene with his first feature, "Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition" (1968), combining sophisticated political analysis with a ripe and urgent sense of humor in a unique way. The story of Dom, a revoluntionary with a reactionary personality, the film dares to satirize the avant-garde politicos of the 60s at the same time that it shares their passionate commitment. It showed us then--and continues to show us not--where we went wrong. It remains a landmark, 20 years ahead of its time. Rare among contemporary British filmmakers, Hatton has been able keep the satiric flame burning on the big screen.

During most of the 70s and 80s, Hatton kept himself busy with TV: "The Bouncing Boy" (1972), "Bitter Harvest" (1973), about Cesar Chavez and the California migrant workers and "Nelly's Version" (1983) stand out. Occasionally during the last 20 years Hatton has been able raise the necessary funds for a feature. "Long Shot" (1978) satirized the film industry on a minuscule budget. "American Roulette" (1988) starred Andy Garcia and did well on the festival circuit. As Hatton says, "the thing about the independent area is that films go from production to retrospective without the intervening stage of distribution."

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CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Imperial City (1980)
3.
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