skip navigation
Millicent Hunt

Millicent Hunt

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

This genteel lead and secondary player was born in the Midwest but raised in NYC. After working briefly as a Powers model, Hunt entered films in the mid-1930s but did not hit her stride until she landed at MGM in the early 40s. She acted in many enjoyable B Westerns early in her career and got laughs as the middle and very bookish Bennet sister in the Greer Garson-Laurence Olivier version of "Pride and Prejudice" (1940). The versatile actress amassed a number of fine performances including a turn as a socialite in "The Human Comedy" (1943) and later appeared in the gripping, Anthony Mann-directed film noir "Raw Deal" (1948).Hunt's liberal leanings led to her being blacklisted in the 1950s. Nevertheless, she continued working on stage, touring in such shows as T.S. Eliot's "The Cocktail Party" (1951) and "The Lady's Not for Burning" (1952-54) as well as appearing in California productions of "Private Lives" and "Major Barbara." There were occasional film roles in such efforts as "The Happy Time" (1952) and "No Place to Hide" (1957). During the 60s, she continued to make occasional TV and stage appearances. After a decade off the big screen, during which she became active in civic and charitable...

This genteel lead and secondary player was born in the Midwest but raised in NYC. After working briefly as a Powers model, Hunt entered films in the mid-1930s but did not hit her stride until she landed at MGM in the early 40s. She acted in many enjoyable B Westerns early in her career and got laughs as the middle and very bookish Bennet sister in the Greer Garson-Laurence Olivier version of "Pride and Prejudice" (1940). The versatile actress amassed a number of fine performances including a turn as a socialite in "The Human Comedy" (1943) and later appeared in the gripping, Anthony Mann-directed film noir "Raw Deal" (1948).

Hunt's liberal leanings led to her being blacklisted in the 1950s. Nevertheless, she continued working on stage, touring in such shows as T.S. Eliot's "The Cocktail Party" (1951) and "The Lady's Not for Burning" (1952-54) as well as appearing in California productions of "Private Lives" and "Major Barbara." There were occasional film roles in such efforts as "The Happy Time" (1952) and "No Place to Hide" (1957). During the 60s, she continued to make occasional TV and stage appearances. After a decade off the big screen, during which she became active in civic and charitable activities, Hunt was cast as Timothy Bottom's mother in "Johnny, Got His Gun" (1971) but her feature career was virtually over. She made only one other screen appearance, as a party guest, in George Cukor's last film "Rich and Famous" (1981).

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute