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David Zippel

David Zippel

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Also Known As: David J Zippel Died:
Born: May 17, 1954 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: lyricist, director

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Raised in Easton, Pennsylvania
:
Contributed lyrics to the Off-Broadway revue "A... My Name is Alice"
1984:
Was contributing lyricist to the Off-Broadway revue, "Diamonds"
1984:
Provided the original songs for "5,6,7,8 ... Dance!", starring Sandy Duncan
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Wrote Off-Broadway musical "Just So" with composer Doug Katsaros
1990:
Made his Broadway debut as lyricist with "City of Angels"; music composed by Cy Coleman; show won six Tony Awards including Best Musical and Best Score
1993:
Returned to Broadway as lyricist of "The Goodbye Girl" (music by Marvin Hamlisch, book by Neil Simon)
1994:
Co-directed (with Joe Leonardo) the Chicago revival production of "The Goodbye Girl"
1994:
First feature credit, wrote lyrics for the animated "The Swan Princess"; music composed by Lex de Azevedo
1997:
Collaborated with composer Alan Menken on the tunes for Disney's animated feature "Hercules"
1998:
Teamed with composer Matthew Wilder to write the song score for Disney's animated feature "Mulan"
:
Collaborated with Menken on the score for a stage musical biography of director Busby Berkeley
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Education

University of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania -
Harvard Law School: Cambridge , Massachusetts -

Notes

For the 1997 London production of "The Goodbye Girl", many of Zippel's lyrics were thrown out in favor of new ones provided by Don Black, creating a sort of weird hybrid musical. "I was very busy working on 'Hercules' and 'Mulan', so I wasn't able to take the time" to work on the London show, Zippel told Variety by phone from Orlando, FL. Then, after catching replacement lyricist Don Black's amended version in tryout previews in Bromley, Zippel became aware that "two songs and a few reprises of mine were all that remained in the show. I felt that to take billing inaccurately reflected my participation, (so) I asked them to take my name off." --David Zippel in Variety, May 4, 1997.

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