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Marshall Brickman

Marshall Brickman

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: August 25, 1939 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Rio de Janeiro, BR Profession: director, screenwriter, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A former member of the folksinging groups The Tarriers and The Journeymen, Marshall Brickman wrote for television before beginning his highly successful association with Woody Allen. Brickman co-wrote two of Allen's best-loved films, "Annie Hall" (1977) and "Manhattan" (1979), before branching out on his own with the overlooked, cynical comedy "Simon" (1980) and the thoughtful anti-nuclear thriller "The Manhattan Project" (1986). It was with "Candid Camera" that Brickman broke into TV in 1966, and after a short stay with Allen Funt, moved on to Johnny Carson. Brickman was one of the key writers for "The Tonight Show" (NBC, 1966-70) and also participated in the 1969 primetime special "Johnny Carson's Repertory Company in an Evening of Comedy." That same year, he first worked with Woody Allen as one of the writers on Allen's NBC special. In 1970, Brickman moved from Carson to Dick Cavett, writing and producing for Cavett's ABC show through 1972, a period in which the show won several Emmy Awards. Brickman left TV and began to concentrate on feature films. In 1973, he joined Allen in co-writing "Sleeper," the film which advanced Allen's directing career. After a lull, Brickman and Allen worked on...

A former member of the folksinging groups The Tarriers and The Journeymen, Marshall Brickman wrote for television before beginning his highly successful association with Woody Allen. Brickman co-wrote two of Allen's best-loved films, "Annie Hall" (1977) and "Manhattan" (1979), before branching out on his own with the overlooked, cynical comedy "Simon" (1980) and the thoughtful anti-nuclear thriller "The Manhattan Project" (1986). It was with "Candid Camera" that Brickman broke into TV in 1966, and after a short stay with Allen Funt, moved on to Johnny Carson. Brickman was one of the key writers for "The Tonight Show" (NBC, 1966-70) and also participated in the 1969 primetime special "Johnny Carson's Repertory Company in an Evening of Comedy." That same year, he first worked with Woody Allen as one of the writers on Allen's NBC special. In 1970, Brickman moved from Carson to Dick Cavett, writing and producing for Cavett's ABC show through 1972, a period in which the show won several Emmy Awards.

Brickman left TV and began to concentrate on feature films. In 1973, he joined Allen in co-writing "Sleeper," the film which advanced Allen's directing career. After a lull, Brickman and Allen worked on "Annie Hall" (1977), for which they shared the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. The pair also fashioned a valentine to NYC with "Manhattan" (1979). Both features established Allen's credentials as a cinematic analyst of modern urban society. Brickman went his own way writing and directing "Simon" (1980), which starred his former partner from The Tarriers, Alan Arkin, as a man brainwashed to think he's come from another planet. The film met with a limited release (and frequently turns up on cable). Brickman's next effort, "Lovesick" (1983), was given a far greater release by Warner Bros. Starring Dudley Moore as a psychiatrist obsessed with his patient (Elizabeth McGovern) and communicating with the spirit of Freud (Alec Guinness), the love story-cum-urban neurosis was not a box office success either. Brickman fared better with critics, but not necessarily with the box office in 1986 with "The Manhattan Project," a well-meaning anti-nuclear riff in which young Christopher Collet steals plutonium to build his own reactor. The film is frequently shown on TV where it has built a large following. Brickman wrote the screenplay for the 1991 Bette Midler vehicle "For the Boys," a box office disaster about a USO singer and a comic who team and find success. Helmed by Mark Rydell, the film is generally entertaining, but something of a throwback to 1950s films, but it features a strong central performance by Midler. Rydell also directed Brickman's screenplay for the Richard Gere-Sharon Stone melodrama "Intersection" (1994). Brickman resumed working with Woody Allen after 15 years with "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (1993), a pleasantly diverting caper that also marked Allen's reteaming with Diane Keaton.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
  Manhattan Project, The (1986) Director
3.
  Lovesick (1983) Director
4.
  Simon (1980) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 That's Adequate (1989) Himself
2.
 Funny (1989) Director
3.
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Milestones close milestones

1977:
Co-wrote "Annie Hall" with Allen; earned Oscar for Best Screenplay
1973:
Had first screenwriter credit, co-scripting "Sleeper" with Woody Allen
1994:
Penned the script for "Intersection"
1966:
Was on writing staff of "The Tonight Show"
1980:
Made feature film directing debut, "Simon" (also first film as solo writer)
1983:
Wrote and directed "Lovesick"
1969:
Co-wrote "The Woody Allen Special" (NBC)
:
Produced "The Dick Cavett Show"
1993:
Resumed working with Allen, co-writing "Manhattan Murder Mystery", featuring Diane Keaton
:
Was member of folk-singing groups The Journeymen and The Tarriers
2001:
Directed Keaton in the Showtime adaptation of the stage play "Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All"
1966:
Worked on staff of "Candid Camera"
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Education

University of Wisconsin: Madison, Wisconsin - 1962

Notes

Brickman has contributed humor pieces to numerous publications, including THE NEW YORKER.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Nina Feinberg. Filmmaker and editor.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Abram Brickman.
mother:
Pauline Brickman.
daughter:
Jessica Brickman.

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