skip navigation
Robert Harron

Robert Harron

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

The Avenging Conscience: Or... Directed by D.W. Griffith. Starring Donald Crisp, Josephine Crowell, Spottiswood... more info $9.95was $14.95 Buy Now

True Heart Susie (1919) ... Originally released in 1919. Directed by D.W. Griffith. Starring Clarine... more info $8.95was $14.95 Buy Now

Intolerance ... Intolerance and it's terrible effects are examined in four historical eras. In... more info $29.95was $38.99 Buy Now

The Birth of a Nation ... Lillian Gish, Henry B. Walthail. This epic story of two families during the... more info $21.95was $29.95 Buy Now

Biograph Shorts: Special... The selection of motion pictures featured in this two-disc set traces D. W.... more info $21.95was $29.95 Buy Now

Also Known As: Bobby Harron, Bobbie Harron Died: September 5, 1920
Born: April 24, 1893 Cause of Death: gunshot wound (possibly accidental)
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: actor, messenger, stage manager

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A brilliant, boyish actor discovered when working as a gofer at Biograph in 1907, Harron began as a bit-player in such films as "Dr. Skinnum" (his first, 1907) and "Bobbie's Kodak" (1908). But it took director D.W. Griffith to make a star out of him. Beginning in 1909 with "The Lonely Villa," Griffith molded Harron into a sensitive dramatic player in such films as "The Musketeers of Pig Alley" (1912), "The Battle at Elderbush Gulch" (1913) and "Judith of Bethulia" (1914). The exceptionally handsome young actor made an endearingly boy-next-door leading man for such Griffith stock actresses as Mary Pickford (eight films), Lillian Gish (15 films), Blanche Sweet (seven films), and, most prolifically, Mae Marsh (27 films). Harron's first breakthrough role was in the modern sequence of "Intolerance" (1916). His striking performance as a small-town boy who gets involved in big-city crime and is movingly redeemed by love was one of the film's high points. Another tour de force was as a front-line soldier in "Hearts of the World" (1918). More typical were his turns as shy, gawky swains in "The Greatest Thing in Life" (1918) and "A Romance of Happy Valley" (1919). That year, Harron was also paired with...

A brilliant, boyish actor discovered when working as a gofer at Biograph in 1907, Harron began as a bit-player in such films as "Dr. Skinnum" (his first, 1907) and "Bobbie's Kodak" (1908). But it took director D.W. Griffith to make a star out of him. Beginning in 1909 with "The Lonely Villa," Griffith molded Harron into a sensitive dramatic player in such films as "The Musketeers of Pig Alley" (1912), "The Battle at Elderbush Gulch" (1913) and "Judith of Bethulia" (1914). The exceptionally handsome young actor made an endearingly boy-next-door leading man for such Griffith stock actresses as Mary Pickford (eight films), Lillian Gish (15 films), Blanche Sweet (seven films), and, most prolifically, Mae Marsh (27 films).

Harron's first breakthrough role was in the modern sequence of "Intolerance" (1916). His striking performance as a small-town boy who gets involved in big-city crime and is movingly redeemed by love was one of the film's high points. Another tour de force was as a front-line soldier in "Hearts of the World" (1918). More typical were his turns as shy, gawky swains in "The Greatest Thing in Life" (1918) and "A Romance of Happy Valley" (1919). That year, Harron was also paired with Griffith newcomer Clarine Seymour in "The Girl Who Stayed at Home"; he also acted with Seymour in Griffith's delightful Lillian Gish vehicle, "True Heart Susie" (1919).

Harron was signed by Metro in 1920, but made only one film for them, "Coincidence" (released posthumously in 1921) before dying mysteriously in New York. Harron, who was reportedly engaged to Dorothy Gish, went East for the premiere of her film "Way Down East." On September 1, 1920, he was shot in the lung by a gun which--he said--fell out of his jacket while he was unpacking. He died on September 5 and his death was listed as "accidental."

Harron was the brother of leading man and character actor John (a.k.a. Johnnie) Harron, as well as actor Charles Harron, who died in an auto accident in 1915, and actress Tessie Harron, who died in the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 TBD (2005)
2.
 Coincidence (1921) Billy Jenks
3.
 The Mother and the Law (1919) The boy
4.
 The Girl Who Stayed at Home (1919) Jim Grey
5.
 A Romance of Happy Valley (1919) John L. Logan, Jr.
6.
 True Heart Susie (1919) William Jenkins
7.
 The Greatest Question (1919) Jimmie Hilton
8.
 The Greatest Thing in Life (1918) Edward Livingston
9.
 The Great Love (1918) James Young of Youngtown, Pa.
10.
 Hearts of the World (1918) The boy, Douglas Gordon Hamilton
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1907:
Film debut, "Dr. Skinnum"
1907:
Signed with American Mutoscope and Biograph
1909:
First film with D.W. Griffith, "The Lonely Villa"
:
Signed with Reliance-Majestic
1916:
Most famous role, The Boy, in "Intolerance"
:
Signed with Triangle
1920:
Signed with Metro
1921:
Final film, "Coincidence" (released posthumously)
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Dorothy Gish. Actor. Appeared together in films.

Family close complete family listing

sister:
Tessie Harron. Actor. Born Feb 16, 1896 in NYC; died at age 22 during the Spanish flu epidemic on November 9, 1918 in Los Angeles, California.
brother:
Charles Harron. Actor. Died in car accident on December 24, 1915 in Los Angeles.
brother:
John Harron. Actor.
sister:
Mary Harron. Actor.
sister:
Jessie Harron. Actor.
sister:
Edna Harron.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute