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Rose Troche

Rose Troche

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA Profession: director, screenwriter, editor, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmmaker whose feature debut "Go Fish" (1994), a 16mm romantic comedy set in the lesbian community of Chicago's Wicker Park, was the hit of the Sundance Film Festival and was the first of the features there to gain a distributor. Troche had made short films and worked in video in the years preceding "Go Fish," which was shot over 1991 and 1992 and wrapped with the financial intervention of independent producers Christine Vachon and Tom Kalin."Go Fish" starred Troche's co-writer and co-producer Guinevere Turner, whose search for romance brings about countless frustrations, quips, awkward interactions and finally love itself with a rather unexpected object choice. The feature proved to be a deft comedy which keenly explored the very idea of community as it portrayed contemporary urban lesbian culture. Its stylistic pleasures were based on its roots in low-budget and video filmmaking, its occasional forays into overt political questions balanced with small revelations possessing the charm and insight of good gossip.It took several years, but Troche delivered an impressive follow-up feature, "Bedrooms & Hallways" (1998), a frothy romantic comedy that married elements of Noel Coward's "Design for Living"...

Filmmaker whose feature debut "Go Fish" (1994), a 16mm romantic comedy set in the lesbian community of Chicago's Wicker Park, was the hit of the Sundance Film Festival and was the first of the features there to gain a distributor. Troche had made short films and worked in video in the years preceding "Go Fish," which was shot over 1991 and 1992 and wrapped with the financial intervention of independent producers Christine Vachon and Tom Kalin.

"Go Fish" starred Troche's co-writer and co-producer Guinevere Turner, whose search for romance brings about countless frustrations, quips, awkward interactions and finally love itself with a rather unexpected object choice. The feature proved to be a deft comedy which keenly explored the very idea of community as it portrayed contemporary urban lesbian culture. Its stylistic pleasures were based on its roots in low-budget and video filmmaking, its occasional forays into overt political questions balanced with small revelations possessing the charm and insight of good gossip.

It took several years, but Troche delivered an impressive follow-up feature, "Bedrooms & Hallways" (1998), a frothy romantic comedy that married elements of Noel Coward's "Design for Living" and Arthur Schnitzler's "Reigen/La Ronde." Instead of modern lesbians, Troche opted to focus on a British gay man whose 30th birthday causes him to reflect on his life. A comic examination of gender and sexual identity and attraction, "Bedrooms & Hallways" proved popular on the festival circuit before First Run Features picked it up for domestic distribution. Troche exhibited a strong command of the material, a flair for visual stylings and a gentle hand in guiding her ensemble cast which included Kevin McKidd as the protagonist, James Purefoy as the object of his affection and Tom Hollander as McKidd's flamboyant flatmate.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Safety of Objects, The (2001) Director
3.
  Go Fish (1994)

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Pride Divide (1997)
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Milestones close milestones

1994:
Feature film directorial, producing and screenwriting debut, "Go Fish"
1997:
Appeared as herself in "Pride Divide"
1998:
Directed the romantic comedy "Bedrooms and Hallways", starring Kevin McKidd
2001:
Wrote and directed "The Safety of Objects"; screened at Toronto Film Festival
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Education

University of Illinois: Urbana , Illinois -

Notes

"Back when we were casting, I thought if I could make a genderless movie, that's something I would so love to do. As we go into the next century, can we please leave some of our identity politics back here? Cinema is so that's one thing it should do. Films are out different reasons, but a movie like 'Bedrooms & Hallways' happens to be out there for a similar reason to, I think, 'The Object of My Affection', which is to further an understanding and to loosen a grip on what is right and what is wrong and say that these things are understandable. Can we not treat them as being so different any more?" --Rose Troche to Andrew L Urban at Urban Cinefile (www.urbancinefile.com.au)

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