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The Yorkshire raised son of a former actor turned vicar, Matthew Warchus was at first considering following in his father's first profession until he discovered a preference for directing while still a college student. Shortly after graduating from the University of Bristol, he created a bit of a stir with his staging of "Sejanus: His Fall," an obscure Ben Jonson play. Warchus then returned to his native area and served two years as associate director of the West Yorkshire Playhouse, proving equally effective as a director of plays (e.g., "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?") and musicals (e.g., "Fiddler on the Roof"). In 1992, he made his West End debut as director of "Much Ado About Nothing" and subsequently attracted further attention with his interpretation of Sam Shepard's seminal work "True West" at the Donmar Warehouse in 1994.Warchus truly became internationally known after directing "Art," Yasmina Reza's 1996 three character comedy-drama about male friendship. The London production was an immediate hit and spawned a Tony-winning Broadway stand. The busy director barely stopped working, overseeing Alex Jennings' acclaimed turn as "Hamlet" in 1997 and reuniting with playwright Reza for her...

The Yorkshire raised son of a former actor turned vicar, Matthew Warchus was at first considering following in his father's first profession until he discovered a preference for directing while still a college student. Shortly after graduating from the University of Bristol, he created a bit of a stir with his staging of "Sejanus: His Fall," an obscure Ben Jonson play. Warchus then returned to his native area and served two years as associate director of the West Yorkshire Playhouse, proving equally effective as a director of plays (e.g., "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?") and musicals (e.g., "Fiddler on the Roof"). In 1992, he made his West End debut as director of "Much Ado About Nothing" and subsequently attracted further attention with his interpretation of Sam Shepard's seminal work "True West" at the Donmar Warehouse in 1994.

Warchus truly became internationally known after directing "Art," Yasmina Reza's 1996 three character comedy-drama about male friendship. The London production was an immediate hit and spawned a Tony-winning Broadway stand. The busy director barely stopped working, overseeing Alex Jennings' acclaimed turn as "Hamlet" in 1997 and reuniting with playwright Reza for her two-hander "The Unexpected Man."

Like many of his contemporaries (i.e., Nicholas Hytner, Sam Mendes, Deborah Warner), Warchus did not want to be pigeonholed strictly as a theater director. He had branched out to opera and it was perhaps inevitable that he would try filmmaking. Given his success with Sam Shepard's "True West" (which he re-staged to great acclaim on Broadway in 2000), he was able to obtain from the playwright the screen rights to "Simpatico." Released in 1999, the film version, which Warchus co-wrote with David Nicholls, captured the spirit of Shepard's work and provided strong roles for screen veterans Jeff Bridges, Nick Nolte and Sharon Stone. Warchus did not return to the screen for another 15 years, when he directed the 1980s period piece "Pride" (2014), based on a real incident in which striking Welsh miners and London-based gay activists formed a common bond in Thatcher's England.

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