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Chuck Palahniuk

Chuck Palahniuk

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Although David Kelly had made his name in his native Ireland as one of the world's foremost interpreters of the work of fellow countryman Samuel Beckett, he first became known for a series of appearances on British sitcoms in the 1970s and 80s. At an age when most actors might consider retirement, this scrawny actor found himself an unlikely sex symbol after a rear-view nude scene in the pleasantly surprising comedy "Waking Ned Devine" (1998). The Dublin-born actor received his training at the famed Abbey Theatre and spent a good part of his career concentrating on stage roles. Kelly distinguished himself as a fine interpreter of Irish playwrights including Brendan Behan, George Bernard Shaw (in whose work he toured Europe) and most especially Beckett. (Kelly even appeared at NYC's Lincoln Center in the playwright's one-man "Krapp's Last Tape".) He had appeared in supporting or character part in films as far back as the 1950s, but few were of any substance. It really wasn't until his turn as the storytelling grandfather in "Into the West" (1992) that Kelly had a truly meaty role. He also offered fine support to Albert Finney in a pair of Irish-themed films, "A Man of No Importance" (1994) and "The...

Although David Kelly had made his name in his native Ireland as one of the world's foremost interpreters of the work of fellow countryman Samuel Beckett, he first became known for a series of appearances on British sitcoms in the 1970s and 80s. At an age when most actors might consider retirement, this scrawny actor found himself an unlikely sex symbol after a rear-view nude scene in the pleasantly surprising comedy "Waking Ned Devine" (1998).

The Dublin-born actor received his training at the famed Abbey Theatre and spent a good part of his career concentrating on stage roles. Kelly distinguished himself as a fine interpreter of Irish playwrights including Brendan Behan, George Bernard Shaw (in whose work he toured Europe) and most especially Beckett. (Kelly even appeared at NYC's Lincoln Center in the playwright's one-man "Krapp's Last Tape".) He had appeared in supporting or character part in films as far back as the 1950s, but few were of any substance. It really wasn't until his turn as the storytelling grandfather in "Into the West" (1992) that Kelly had a truly meaty role. He also offered fine support to Albert Finney in a pair of Irish-themed films, "A Man of No Importance" (1994) and "The Run of the Country" (1995). When paired onscreen with Ian Bannen as old friends who try to find out which one of their neighbors has won a lottery, Kelly truly shone. A contrast in opposites. he and Bannen worked well together and their breezy chemistry aided the film's success. As the wiry and high-strung sidekick to Bannen's mischievous schemer. Kelly proved a scene-stealer, especially when he agrees to impersonate the dead sweepstakes winner. As Roger Ebert wrote in his Chicago Sun-Times review: "The treasure of the local population is Michael O'Sullivan, who is played by David Kelly in what can only be described as a performance arriving at the ultimate reaches of geezerdom. Kelly, with his twinkling eyes and turkey neck, is engaging, conspiratorial and delighted by all things not too wicked."

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CAST: (feature film)

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