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Danny Glover

Danny Glover

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Also Known As: Danny Lebern Glover, Daniel Glover Died:
Born: July 22, 1946 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: San Francisco, California, USA Profession: actor, director, producer, lecturer, researcher, "Model Cities" evaluator, sheetrock painter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A talented actor who effortlessly projected gravitas, warmth and menace in equal amounts, depending on the role, Danny Glover enjoyed stardom in the 1980s and 1990s with the "Lethal Weapon" (1987) series and other mainstream titles before settling into steady work as a character player in numerous independent films and television series while also honing an award-winning second career as a documentary and feature producer. Born Danny Lebern Glover on July 22, 1946 in San Francisco, California, he was the son of postal workers who were also active in civil rights through the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. His involvement in acting began as a student at San Francisco State University, where he appeared in a play by Amiri Baraka; after leaving the school in the late 1960s, Glover worked for the City of San Francisco as a evaluations specialist before returning to acting in the 1970s. He received his dramatic training through the Black Actors' Workshop at the American Conservatory and with Jean Shelton's Shelton Actors Lab before making his screen debut as an inmate in Don Siegel's "Escape from Alcatraz" (1979). He worked steadily on stage - most notably in the Drama...

A talented actor who effortlessly projected gravitas, warmth and menace in equal amounts, depending on the role, Danny Glover enjoyed stardom in the 1980s and 1990s with the "Lethal Weapon" (1987) series and other mainstream titles before settling into steady work as a character player in numerous independent films and television series while also honing an award-winning second career as a documentary and feature producer. Born Danny Lebern Glover on July 22, 1946 in San Francisco, California, he was the son of postal workers who were also active in civil rights through the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. His involvement in acting began as a student at San Francisco State University, where he appeared in a play by Amiri Baraka; after leaving the school in the late 1960s, Glover worked for the City of San Francisco as a evaluations specialist before returning to acting in the 1970s. He received his dramatic training through the Black Actors' Workshop at the American Conservatory and with Jean Shelton's Shelton Actors Lab before making his screen debut as an inmate in Don Siegel's "Escape from Alcatraz" (1979). He worked steadily on stage - most notably in the Drama Desk-winning Broadway run of Athol Fugard's "Master Harold. and the Boys" in 1982 - and in character roles on television and in features before earning critical praise as a sympathetic handyman in Robert Benton's "Places in the Heart" (1984). He followed this with a menacing turn as a corrupt police detective in Peter Weir's "Witness" (1985), which underscored his versatility and command of the screen, and he soon settled into a string of substantive character parts in major features like the abusive Mr. Johnsonn in Stephen Spielberg's "The Color Purple" (1985) and a heroic cowboy in Lawrence Kasdan's "Silverado" (1985). In 1987, Glover settled comfortably into leading man and action hero status as Detective Roger Murtagh, the reluctant partner of loose cannon cop Mel Gibson in Richard Donner's "Lethal Weapon" (1987); a colossal box office hit, it was followed by three successful sequels between 1989 and 1998, but more importantly, granted Glover the clout to not only carry pictures like the HBO biopic "Mandela" (1987), which earned him an Emmy nomination, and the action-dramas "Bat*21" (1988) and Kasdan's "Grand Canyon" (1991), but produce them. His first effort in this regard was Charles Burnett's "To Sleep With Anger" (1991), a critically praised drama about family conflict that earned him an Independent Spirit Award for Best Actor. As the '90s drew to a close, Glover remained a consistent presence in features, though many of these projects - the Disney comedy "Operation Dumbo Drop" (1995), "Gone Fishin'" (1997) with his "Lethal Weapon" co-star Joe Pesci - paled in comparison to his work as a producer for television features like the historical Western "Buffalo Soldiers" (TNT, 1997) and the civil rights drama "Freedom Song" (TNT, 2000), both of which earned multiple Emmy nominations. Glover also devoted considerable energy to civil rights and international causes, including support for Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards and work as a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador. But his acting career continued its busy pace in the new millennium, and he moved effortlessly between independent projects like the horror film "Saw" (2005), guest roles on "ER" (NBC, 1994-2009) and "Brothers and Sisters" (ABC, 2006-2011) and studio projects like "Dreamgirls" (2006). Though his screen time soon trickled down to guest turns in direct-to-video features like "Bad Ass 2: Bad Asses" (2014), part of a curiously popular franchise of action films built around star Danny Trejo as a vengeful senior citizen, his work as producer continued to embrace timely and politically charged subjects, like the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in "Trouble the Water" (2008) and the Thai-made drama "Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives" (2010), which captured the Palm d'Or at Cannes. In 2018, he made a welcome return to prominence as Robert Redford's bank-robbing partner in "The Old Man and the Gun" and as a telemarketing vet who teaches Lakeith Stanfield how to sell to white people in the critically acclaimed "Sorry to Bother You." The films were just two of nine film appearances he made in that year alone, with at least a dozen more soon to follow.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Toussaint (2007)
2.
  Just a Dream (2002) Director
3.
  Override (1994) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Come Sunday (2018)
3.
4.
 Proud Mary (2018)
6.
7.
 Monster Trucks (2017)
8.
9.
 Dirty Grandpa (2016)
10.
 Almost Christmas (2016)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1991:
Appeared opposite Alfre Woodard in Lawrence Kasdan's "Grand Canyon"
2008:
Co-starred with Julianne Moore and Mark Ruffalo in Fernando Meirelles' "Blindness"
1993:
Played Alec Haley in CBS miniseries "Queen"
1993:
Narrated "Civil War Journal" (A&E)
1999:
Starred in world premiere of Philip Kan Gotanda's "Yohen" with L.A.'s East West Players
1983:
TV-movie acting debut, "The Face of Rage" (ABC)
1998:
Voiced character of Barbatus in animated feature "Antz"
1997:
Co-starred in lackluster comedy "Gone Fishin'"; re-teamed with "Lethal Weapon 2" co-star Joe Pesci
1994:
Helmed "Override" for Showtime series "Directed By"
1996:
Executive produced HBO movies "The Deadly Voyage" and "America's Dream"; acted in one segment of the latter
2006:
Produced "Bamako," a film about the African debt
1997:
Starred in superior made-for-cable period drama "Buffalo Soldiers" (TNT)
1982:
Made Broadway debut in Fugard's "Master Harold...and the Boys"
2003:
Reunited with "Color Purple" co-star Whoopi Goldberg in "Good Fences" (Showtime)
2010:
Co-starred in Chris Rock-produced black comedy "Death at a Funeral," a remake of 2007 British film of the same name
1984:
First lead role in a feature, straight-to-video comedy "The Stand-In"
2000:
Played a corrupt African president in Cheick Oumar Sissoko's film "Battu" (shown at the Toronto International Film Festival)
1989:
Co-starred in made-for-TV blockbuster Western "Lonesome Dove" (CBS)
2007:
Acted opposite Mark Wahlberg in political thriller "Shooter"
1986:
First screen collaboration with co-star Alfre Woodard, PBS semi-documentary "Mandela"
2002:
Helmed Showtime original movie "Just a Dream"
1983:
Made miniseries debut in "Chiefs" (CBS)
1995:
Played detective Philip Marlowe in the "Red Wind" episode of Showtime series "Fallen Angels"
2009:
Played the U.S. President in Roland Emmerich's disaster film "2012"
1987:
Reteamed with Woodard in HBO biopic "Mandela"
2001:
Starred in and executive produced "3 AM" (Showtime), a crime drama produced by Spike Lee
2000:
Starred in film adaptation of Fugard's play "Boesman & Lena," about two homeless people surviving the harsh terrain of the Cape Flats in South Africa; filmed 1999 and premiered at 2000 Cannes Film Festival
2010:
Voiced character of Winston in animated feature "Alpha and Omega"
2012:
Appeared on short-lived mystery drama series "Touch"
2013:
Co-starred with Common in drama feature "LUV"
2013:
Co-starred with Parker Posey in highschool-set dramedy "Highland Park"
2014:
Appeared in romantic drama "Beyond the Lights"
2015:
Headlined the cast of action flick "Gridlocked"
2016:
Appeared in Robert De Niro/Zac Efron vehicle "Dirty Grandpa"
2016:
Played the mayor of New York City on Amazon's "Mozart in the Jungle"
2017:
Narrated "Cold Case Files"
2018:
Returned with supporting turns in "The Old Man and the Gun" and "Sorry to Bother You"
1984:
Landed his breakthrough role as Moze in Robert Benton's "Places in the Heart"
2006:
Co-starred as James 'Thunder' Early's (Eddie Murphy) manager in Bill Condon's adaptation of 1981 Broadway musical "Dreamgirls"
1985:
Played a cowboy in Lawrence Kasdan's "Silverado"
1998:
Reprised his signature role in "Lethal Weapon 4"
2000:
Earned Emmy nomination for his performance in the TNT original production "Freedom Song"
1987:
Had his first collaboration with co-star Mel Gibson and director Richard Donner, "Lethal Weapon"; played LAPD officer Roger Murtaugh opposite Gibson's Martin Riggs
1985:
Had his first feature lead in a theatrical release in Steven Spielberg's "The Color Purple"
1980:
Made off-Broadway debut in Athol Fugard's play "The Blood Knot"
1989:
Starred in PBS adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun," directed by Bill Duke for "American Playhouse"
1998:
Co-starred with Oprah Winfrey in film adaptation of Toni Morrison's Pulitzer-Prize-winning novel "Beloved"
1992:
Returned to play Murtagh in "Lethal Weapon 3"
1990:
Made his feature debut as an executive producer, "To Sleep With Anger"
1979:
Made film-acting debut in "Escape From Alcatraz"
1989:
Reteamed with Gibson and Donner for second outing "Lethal Weapon 2"
2001:
Starred opposite Anjelica Huston and Gene Hackman in Wes Anderson's "The Royal Tenenbaums"
2016:
Co-starred in holiday comedy "Almost Christmas"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

George Washington High School: San Francisco, California -
American University: Washington, Washington D.C. -
San Francisco State University: San Francisco, California -
Black Actors Workshop at the American Conservatory Theater: San Francisco, California -
Shelton Actors Lab: San Francisco, California -

Notes

Glover was inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame in 1990.

He is a recipient of the Phoenix Award from the Black American Cinema Society.

In November 1999, Glover filed a racial-bias complaint with the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission claiming he had been by-passed by several drivers while attempting to hail a cab in Harlem.

"Racial progress in Hollywood is mostly cosmetic. Hollywood has always been a conservative place, because it doesn't consider itself art. It's about making money and getting people to buy something." --Danny Glover in Parade, February 11, 1996.

"He has a kind of laid-back comic dryness to him that really works." --Mel Gibson to Premiere, February 1992

"Danny believes that he's an important part of the fabric of what's possible for black filmmakers." --Bill Duke to Premiere, February 1992.

"Art is supposed to challenge conventional thinking . . . I like to illuminate the human experience with my work--to create dialogue, to stop people from thinking that our experiences are limited to 125th and Lenox." --Glover to the Daily News, November 2, 1997.

"I'm a child of the civil rights movement. My grandfather was born before the turn of the century, with memories of slavery in his mind, and my mother and father . . . they made me feel part of this continuum. They made me feel what was important. They brought me to this place where I am, right now." --Glover to the San Francisco Examiner, October 18, 1998.

"I don't live an extravagant life. But you still face choices. With movies, you sometimes reach a point when it becomes difficult to say no. You don't want to make a film just because you think it will be a commercial success, but it's not always that simple. Maybe you have a daughter in college or a brother who needs an operation. It's easy to be noble about turning down a $10 million film if you have a whole lineup of $10 million films in front of you. But most of the time you don't. If you had told me in 1997 that I had to choose between 'Beloved' and 'Lethal Weapon 4,' it would have been a very difficult decision, but you know what? I'd have done 'Lethal Weapon.' I'd have kicked myself over and over, but sometimes you just can't turn down X amount of dollars." --Glover to the Daily News, June 13, 2000.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Asake Bomani. Former jazz singer, art gallery owner. Married in 1975; met at San Francisco State University; owns gallery in San Francisco; Glover filed for divorce in May 1999.

Family close complete family listing

father:
James Glover. Postal worker, union organizer. Active in NAACP.
mother:
Carrie Glover. Postal worker, union organizer. Active in NAACP; died in 1983.
daughter:
Mandisa Glover. Production assistant. Born in 1976; name means "sweet" in Swahili; mother, Asake Bomani.

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