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Diane Keaton

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Also Known As: Dorrie Hall, Diane Hall Died:
Born: January 5, 1946 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: actor, director, producer, photographer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

As a multi-faceted actress, director and producer, Diane Keaton received her start as a favorite actress - as well as off-screen girlfriend - of filmmaker Woody Allen, earning a Best Actress Academy Award for her breakout performance in "Annie Hall" (1977). Prior to that, she was the troubled wife of Michael Corleone in "The Godfather" (1972) and "The Godfather, Part II" (1974), and further displayed her dramatic chops as a promiscuous schoolteacher in "Looking for Mr. Goodbar" (1977). Following a role in Woody Allen's "Manhattan" (1979), she earned another Oscar nod for Warren Beatty's "Reds" (1981) and had another critical success with "Crimes of the Heart" (1986). Keaton made her directing debut with the documentary "Heaven" (1987) and segued into television with "The Girl with the Crazy Brother" (CBS, 1990). Along the way, she starred opposite Steve Martin in "Father of the Bride" (1989), reprised Kay Corleone for "The Godfather, Part III" (1990) and had her last role with Allen in "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (1993). Meanwhile, she scored a big hit with "The First Wives Club" (1996), directed the box-office dud "Hanging Up" (2000) and revived that failure with an acclaimed turn opposite Jack...

As a multi-faceted actress, director and producer, Diane Keaton received her start as a favorite actress - as well as off-screen girlfriend - of filmmaker Woody Allen, earning a Best Actress Academy Award for her breakout performance in "Annie Hall" (1977). Prior to that, she was the troubled wife of Michael Corleone in "The Godfather" (1972) and "The Godfather, Part II" (1974), and further displayed her dramatic chops as a promiscuous schoolteacher in "Looking for Mr. Goodbar" (1977). Following a role in Woody Allen's "Manhattan" (1979), she earned another Oscar nod for Warren Beatty's "Reds" (1981) and had another critical success with "Crimes of the Heart" (1986). Keaton made her directing debut with the documentary "Heaven" (1987) and segued into television with "The Girl with the Crazy Brother" (CBS, 1990). Along the way, she starred opposite Steve Martin in "Father of the Bride" (1989), reprised Kay Corleone for "The Godfather, Part III" (1990) and had her last role with Allen in "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (1993). Meanwhile, she scored a big hit with "The First Wives Club" (1996), directed the box-office dud "Hanging Up" (2000) and revived that failure with an acclaimed turn opposite Jack Nicholson in the comedy "Something's Gotta Give" (2003). By the time she starred in the romantic comedy "Morning Glory" (2010), the ever stylish Keaton was well known for showcasing powerful emotional journeys of typically non-conformist characters, while having made significant contributions to movies, television, photography, interior design and fashion.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Hanging Up (2000) Director
2.
  Unstrung Heroes (1995) Director
3.
  Wildflower (1991) Director
4.
  Heaven (1987) Director
5.
  What Does Dorrie Want? (1982) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Finding Dory (2016)
2.
 And So It Goes (2014)
4.
 Big Wedding, The (2013)
6.
 Morning Glory (2010)
7.
 Smother (2008)
8.
 Mad Money (2008)
9.
 Mama's Boy (2007)
10.
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in Santa Ana, CA
1968:
Made Broadway debut in "Hair"; became known as the girl who would not remove her clothes in the finale
1969:
Acted opposite Woody Allen (also directed) in the Broadway production of "Play It Again, Sam"; earned a Tony nomination
1970:
Film acting debut in "Lovers and Other Strangers"
1971:
Starred opposite Allen in the writer-director's "lost" 25-minute short "Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story"; film shelved by PBS in 1972 due to its controversal subject matter; discovered in 1997 at WNET in NYC
1972:
First feature opposite Allen, reprising her stage role in "Play It Again, Sam"; scripted by Allen and directed by Herbert Ross
1972:
Cast in breakthrough role as Kay Adams, the girlfriend and later wife of Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) in Francis Ford Coppola's "The Godfather"
1973:
Co-starred opposite Woody Allen (who also wrote and directed) in the futuristic comedy "Sleeper"
1974:
Reprised role of Kay Corleone in the sequel "The Godfather, Part II"
1975:
Reunited with Allen for "Love and Death," a spoof of Russian literature that owed more than a passing debt to "War and Peace"
1976:
Returned to the New York stage to appear in the Off-Broadway play "The Primary English Class" by Israel Horovitz
1977:
Delivered a fine dramatic turn as a promiscuous schoolteacher in "Looking for Mr. Goodbar"
1977:
Earned a Best Actress Oscar as "Annie Hall"; directed by and co-starring Woody Allen
1978:
Starred in Allen's first drama feature, "Interiors"
1979:
Last starring role in a film opposite Woody Allen for over a decade, "Manhattan"
1981:
Portrayed Louise Bryant to Warren Beatty's John Reed in Beatty's epic "Reds"; garnered a Best Actress Oscar nomination
1982:
Co-starred with Albert Finney as a wife and husband in a collapsing marriage in Alan Parker's "Shoot the Moon"
1982:
Directed short film, "What Does Dorrie Want?"
1984:
Played titular role of a warden's wife who falls in love with one of the inmates (Mel Gibson) in "Mrs. Soffel"
1986:
Co-starred with Jessica Lange and Sissy Spacek in Bruce Bereford's "Crimes of the Heart"; first film with actor Sam Shepard
1986:
Teamed with Jessica Lange and Sissy Spacek as three equally off-center Southern sisters in Bruce Bereford's "Crimes of the Heart", adapted from Beth Henley's Pulitzer Prize-winning play; also first film with actor Sam Shepard
1987:
Starred in Charles Shyer's "Baby Boom"; second collaboration with Sam Shepard
1987:
Documentary feature directing debut, "Heaven"
1987:
Appeared in a cameo role (as a nightclub singer) in Allen's "Radio Days"
1988:
Offered a strong performance as a divorced woman forced to choose between her child and her lover in "The Good Mother"
1989:
Teamed with Steve Martin for Shyer's "Father of the Bride"
1990:
Reteamed with Coppola to once again essay Kay Corleone in "The Godfather, Part III"
1990:
TV directorial debut, "The Girl With the Crazy Brother" a "CBS Schoolbreak Special"
1990:
Helmed the "Fever" episode of the ABC drama "China Beach"
1991:
Directed an episode of ABC's quirky serial "Twin Peaks"
1991:
Helmed first feature-length TV-movie "Wildflower" (Lifetime), starring Patricia Arquette
1992:
TV-movie acting debut, "Running Mates" (HBO); played a journalist who falls in love with a presidential candidate
1993:
Provided the voice of Daphne for "Look Who's Talking Now"
1993:
Replaced Mia Farrow as the leading lady in Woody Allen's "Manhattan Murder Mystery"; last film to date with Allen
:
Formed production company, Blue Relief, with partner Bill Robinson
1994:
Starred as the aviatrix in the TNT biopic "Amelia Earhart: The Final Flight"; earned an Emmy nomination
1995:
Third film with Shyer, "Father of the Bride Part II"
1995:
Feature directorial debut, "Unstrung Heroes"
1996:
Earned third Best Actress Oscar nomination for "Marvin's Room"
1996:
Scored big hit in Hugh Wilson's "The First Wives Club"; co-starred with Goldie Hawn and Bette Midler
1997:
Paired again with Shepard for "The Only Thrill"
1997:
Served as executive producer and star of The Disney Channel movie "Northern Lights"
1999:
Portrayed Juliette Lewis' mother in "The Other Sister"
2000:
Directed Meg Ryan and Lisa Kudrow as sisters coping with the impending death of their problematic father (Walter Matthau) in "Hanging Up"; also co-starred in the film
2000:
Interviewed for Lifetime's documentary of "Beauty and Aging in America"
2001:
Cast as Warren Beatty's wife in "Town and Country"; film also co-starred Goldie Hawn
2001:
Had title role in the Showtime adaptation of Christopher Durang's hit play "Sister Mary Explains It All"
2001:
Was an executive producer and directed the pilot for the fall Fox primetime serial "Pasadena"
2003:
Teamed with Jack Nicholson for the comedy, "Something's Gotta Give"; written and directed by Nancy Myers; earned SAG and Oscar nominations for Best Actress
2005:
Cast as Sybil Stone, the matriarch in "The Family Stone"; written and directed by Thomas Bezucha
2007:
Played an overbearing yet well-intentioned mother in the comedy "Because I Said So"
2008:
Co-starred with Queen Latifah and Katie Holmes in "Mad Money"
2008:
Co-starred alongside Liv Tyler and Dax Shepard in "Smother"
2010:
Played a morning show anchor in the comedy feature "Morning Glory"
2011:
Released her memoir <i>Then Again</i>
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Santa Ana College: Santa Ana , California -
Orange Coast College: Costa Mesa , California -
University of Southern California: Los Angeles , California -
Neighborhood Playhouse: New York , New York -
Santa Ana High School: Santa Ana , California - 1964

Notes

When Keaton was starting out as an actress, she very briefly used her sister's name, Dorrie Hall.

Named Harvard's Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year (1991)

"I'm not a natural-born director. Now that I'm actually doing it, I wonder why everybody wants to in the first place. You have to think of everything." --Diane Keaton quoted in Entermainment Weekly, June 10, 1994.

"I didn't know my dad nearly as well as I know my mother. However, I felt a tremendous closeness to him regarding performing. My father was extraordinary, like a light, when he would come backstage. I had his attention in, yeah, oh boy, a big way. I'll never forget the first time--this is so stupid. I did 'Little Mary Sunshine' in high school. My father was radiant. I was shocked. I didn't know what I had done that made him so excited.

"There was something sweet and kind of innocent about my father in a strange way." --Keaton to Nancy Collins in Vanity Fair, November 1995.

"How could I resent 'Annie Hall', the thing that gave me all I have? I'd have to be a fool, a moron. Besides, good things don't come without problems: Yes, I got typecast, yes, I lost my privacy--but God, give me that again!" --Keaton quoted in New York Women in Fimd and Television News, December 1995.

On eschewing marriage: "I grew up in the 50s, when there was a pervading feeling that you could have it all . . . Of course there's a sadness that in some way I didn't fulfill that early dream.

"I didn't have it in me to go the distance. Sure, maybe that would have been wonderful--fulfilling in a deeper way. On the other hand, I don't envy it at all. I don't think that because I'm not married it's made my life any less. That's the myth of the old maid. It's garbage.

"For a while you think, 'Oh, you have to have someone in your life to be fulfilled.' Now I don't feel that way for a second." --Keaton quoted in Jeffrey Zaslow's "Straight Talk", USA Weekend, December 8-10, 1995.

About her initial brush with fame as a cast member of the original Broadway production of "Hair": "The cast went insane from the attention--people just didn't know how to handle it. I remember somebody had a baby while on LSD in the dressing room. I always sort of felt on the outside of the Tribe (as the 'Hair' cast was called). It's my nature to be cautious and a little bit ... leery." --Keaton to Entertainment Weekly, August 22-29, 1997.

"When I find myself in the absurd position of sitting in the director's chair, I try to sit quietly. I try to leave the actors alone as much as possible. I try not to burden the atmosphere with a lot of talk. Talk is cheap. As Shirley Chisolm said, 'I am not interested in what people say. What I am interested in is what they do.' Sometimes language is used by both actors and directors to evade the moment of truth: action. The use of language to avoid acting is further complicated by the maze of lies we don't identify as lies, hiding our secret fears and insecurities. To me, endless self-involved talk kills impulse. I like to think that as a director I create an atmosphere of trust and, most important, play, in order to ease actors into the scary plunge of acting."

" ... I believe my job as the director is to listen, to laugh, to empathize, to encourage and to be deeply moved by what I hope will be deeply moving performances. My job is to know when the actors are telling the trith, feeling the truth, living the truth--their truth. My job is to make it clear how much I am rooting for them in their effort to find a way, a process, a skill, that unlocks and frees them into giving the audience all their accumulated experiences and insights and feelings in the service of the screenplay." --From "Diane Keaton: Learning to Trust Actions, Not Words" in The New York Times, January 16, 2000.

"The thing about her is, she's really oblivious, She has no idea she's an icon, a fashion icon, an iconic figure in terms of acting."---Amanada Peet on Keaton, who plays her daughter in "Somethings Gotta Give" Entertainment Weekly November 14, 2003

Keaton was named one of People Magazine's 50 Most Beautiful People for 2004

"Actresses are constantly trying to please everyone, or at least I am," she says. "But I don't think plastic surgery solves your problem" Still, she's keeping an open mind: "I was definitly not going to have sex before I got married and that went out the window! So who knows?"---Keaton quoted in People May 10, 2004

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Woody Allen. Director, actor, screenwriter. Together for much of the 1970s; directed Keaton in five films during their relationship including "Annie Hall"; later worked together twice.
companion:
Warren Beatty. Actor, director, screenwriter. Together in the early 1980s; directed and co-starred with Keaton in "Reds" (1981).
companion:
Al Pacino. Actor. Acted together in "The Godfather" trilogy; reportedly became romantically involved during filming of the third part in 1989; no longer together.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Jack Hall. Civil engineer, real estate broker. Died in 1990 from an inoperable brain tumor.
mother:
Dorothy Hall. Semi-professional photographer.
brother:
Randy Hall. Realtor. Born on March 21, 1948.
sister:
Robin Hall. Nurse. Born on March 27, 1951.
sister:
Dorrie Hall. Born on April 1, 1953; subject of Keaton's short film "What Does Dorrie Want?" (1982).
daughter:
Dexter Keaton. Adopted c. December 1995.
son:
Duke Keaton. Adopted; born c. December 2000.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Reservations" Alfred A. Knopf
"Still Life: Hollywood Tableaux Photographs"
"Mr Salesman"
"Local News: Tabloid Pictures from the Los Angeles Herald Express 1928 to 1959" Art Publishers
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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