skip navigation
The Last Frontier

The Last Frontier(1956)

  • Tuesday, July 12 @ 12:00 AM (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
Up
Down
share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

USER REVIEWS

user reviews

See Detailed Ratings
    Acting of Lead Performers
    Acting of Supporting Cast
    Director
    Music Score
    Title Sequence
  • No Ratings Available Add Yours Now
    Screenplay
    Cinematography
    Historical Importance
    Would You Recommend?
  • 0 Member Ratings

Add your ratings! Each of the detailed ratings you select will result in a cumulative score for this film.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

    Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
    Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
    Rate the Director
    Rating of the Music Score
    Rating of the Title Sequence
    Screenplay
    Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
    Importance in Cinema history
    Would you recommend for fans of this genre
Submit Ratings Cancel Write a Review Read Reviews

*By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use. TCM will use your personal information consistent with our Privacy Policy

NO REVIEWS AVAILABLE

The title has not been reviewed. Be the first to write a review by clicking here to start.

  • last frontier

    • kevin sellers
    • 5/19/16

    As the title indicates this film deals with the venerable Western theme of savagery vs. civilization. Unfortunately, it does so in a ponderous, plodding, and overly verbose manner, courtesy of director Anthony Mann and screenwriters Philip Yordan and Russell Hughes. By the time the climactic battle occurs most of the excitement has fled the room thanks to endless scenes with the lead characters alternately psychoanalyzing themselves and ham handedly musing on the Big Question of who is the savage and who is the civilized? About the only reasons to stick with the damn thing are a surprisingly good performance by Victor Mature as a kind of later day Natty Bumpo and the always good James Whitmore as his Irish trapper sidekick slash father figure. By contrast, the usually fine Robert Preston is actually kinda hammy. Let's give it a C plus. P.S. The romantic pairing of Mature and a young (blonde!) Anne Bancroft is beyond weird. Demetrius meets Mrs. Robinson. Ah, the 50s in Hollywood.

  • A very pleasant surprise.

    • Cher
    • 8/6/08

    I watched this movie one afternoon not expecting much and it turned out to be very enjoyable. Even a little risque for it's time no doubt. (1956) Victor Mature was so likeable and what a manly prescence. Well worth the watch.

  • Your Name
  • Your Email (optional)
  • Your Location (optional)
      Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
      Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
      Rate the Director
      Rating of the Music Score
      Rating of the Title Sequence
      Screenplay
      Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
      Importance in Cinema history
      Would you recommend for fans of this genre

  • Title of your Review
  • Your Review

    Character Limit! You have reached the 2,000 word character limit for this review.

  • Preview & Submit Cancel Submit Review Go Back
Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

Click the button below to read reviews and see your posting:

Close Detailed Ratings (optional)

*We protect your personal infortmation and will not provide it to anyone without your consent. For a complete explanation, please refer to TCM's Privacy Policy. By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use.